Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Europe can be high if you’re a citizen of a country that hasn’t adopted the Euro as its currency, but even as a visitor, you can find places to live where your bills won’t break the bank. Many European countries offer low or even no income tax rates, which gives residents an added sense of financial freedom (assuming they’re not spending all of their money on rent). You’ll find the cheapest countries to live in are generally those that are known for their natural beauty and quiet lifestyles.

In a professional tone: The term “cheap” is somewhat relative, but for this article, “cheap” means traveling somewhere where accommodations, food, and public transportation are less expensive than in developed and expensive countries like the United States, Switzerland, and Germany.

The best place to live in Europe depends on your personal preferences, but some places offer a better quality of life and lower cost of living than others. If you want to save money while living in Europe.

Europe is a great place to live and work, and not just because of the questionable quality of life in the UK. The cost of living is lower in many European countries, with some of them being cheaper than living in the US. Though the European Union is attempting to apply a single currency throughout its member states, each country still retains its own identity and culture. Some countries have stronger economies than others, which makes their currency more valuable. As a result, prices in those countries rise.

Cheap European countries generally have a lower cost of living relative to the rest of Europe. Naturally, due to the lower cost of living, the salaries are also lower. Here are the absolute cheapest countries in Europe.

Best Affordable Country In Europe For Students

  1. Estonia
  2. Lithuania
  3. Turkey
  4. Italy
  5. Hungary
  6. Portugal
  7. Greece
  8. Bulgaria
  9. Russia
  10. Poland

Best Affordable Country In Europe for Retirement

  1. Romania
  2. Spain
  3. Portugal
  4. Bulgaria
  5. Montenegro
  6. Poland
  7. Greece
  8. Latvia
  9. Italy
  10. Bulgaria

Best Affordable Country To Work In Europe

  1. Portugal
  2. Spain
  3. Bulgaria
  4. Poland
  5. Slovenia
  6. Croatia
  7. Italy
  8. Russia
  9. Hungary
  10. Romania

Best Affordable Country To Work For English Speakers

  1. Malta 
  2. Romania
  3. Poland
  4. Hungary
  5. Spain
  6. Portugal
  7. Greece
  8. Italy
  9. Czech Republic
  10. Greece

25 Cheapest European Countries For Immigrants [Living Cost Under $2000]

What are the cheapest countries in Europe? If you’re looking to move to Europe, but are hesitant due to the high cost of living, consider these countries where you can get a lot for your dollar.  The below list highlights the most affordable countries in Europe and the reasons why they’re the best value for your money.

We’ve put together a list of the top European countries with low cost of living and high quality of life so you can get an idea of what might suit your lifestyle best.

In alphabetical order, here are the cheapest places in Europe to live as an expat with living cost under $2,000 per month.

1. Albania

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Albania is known as one of many cheap destinations for many years now but it has become even more affordable since 2014 after it officially became a member of the EU. The capital, Tirana is named one of the cheapest cities to visit in Europe, with prices average at £45 per day.

Albania is a very affordable place to live in Europe, not only because it is cheap in general but also because you can find Western products that are of good quality at local prices.

Albania has a small population and there are not many foreigners living there. This makes it an ideal destination for those seeking a quiet and peaceful life in a beautiful country.

To buy any products such as electronics, clothes and many other things, you can easily find them at local prices. However, the quality of these products is not as good as the ones we find in Europe or the US. However, the same can’t be applied to food products grown in the country.

Its capital city, Tirana, houses many historical sites like Skanderbeg Square and the National Historical Museum. It’s also home to some exciting festivals like the International Folklore Festival and the Tirana International Film Festival.

Albania’s economy is dependent on manufacturing, agriculture, and energy but the country is not self-sufficient in food production. In addition to this, it has a high unemployment rate (11.70%) that is predicted to drop further.

The Republic of Albania is an official candidate for membership in the European Union and its official language is Albanian. The official currency of Albania is the Albanian Lek (ALL), which has a nice exchange rate for the USD ($1 – 114.3). 

Best Places To Live & Work In Albania

Tirana is one of the cheapest cities in all of Europe with a population of approximately 800,000. The city has experienced much growth and changes over the past few decades. Today, Tirana is a thriving city with many modern amenities, although it does maintain some elements from its communist past.

The city of Durres is another amazing place to live because it is a port town and has a nice beach. The city is situated on a peninsula, surrounded by mountains. Durres is also known for hosting the summertime music festival, “Rock Durrës”.

Cost Of Living In Albania

The average cost of living for a person is around ALL 57,120 ($500) a month, almost half of Albanians live on less than that.). The cost of living for a family of four is on average, ALL 205,736 ($1800) per month. This amount might be smaller or bigger depending on the lifestyle of a family.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around ALL 32,000 ($280) close to the city.
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost ALL 28,575 to ALL 34,290 ($250 – $300)
  • The average salary in Albania is ALL 58,537 ($512) per month.

2. Belarus

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Belarus is a beautiful country with a lot of history and culture. It is also a very affordable country to live in. The cost of living in Belarus is significantly lower than in Western Europe, the United States, Canada, or Australia.

The cost of living also varies significantly within Belarus depending on where you choose to live. The capital city, Minsk, is more expensive than any other city in the country and has one of the highest costs of living in Central Europe.

There are many cheap products sold at local supermarkets and grocery stores. You can get milk, bread, and other household items in some parts of the country for less than $2 per item. Some food items are not imported from Russia (like fruits) which can be a bit more expensive than the rest of Europe but still much cheaper than other parts of the world.

Belarus has no sales tax or VAT (value-added tax), which means that prices for most items are quoted without taxes included. But there’s a 33% excise tax on fuel and alcohol, so prices listed with “without excise” added on are usually more accurate. The main expenses are housing and transportation costs (fuel). To save money on transportation costs try walking or biking instead of taking a taxi or bus when possible!

The Republic of Belarus is one of the few countries that have asked for membership in the European Union and its official languages are Belarusian and Russian. The official currency of Albania is the Belarusian Ruble (BYN), which has a nice exchange rate for the $1 equals to BYN114.3.  

Best Places To Live & Work In Belarus

Minsk has a very large expatriate community that contributes to its high cost of living. The city has many upscale hotels and restaurants that cater to this clientele.

Today, Minsk is the political, economic, scientific, and cultural capital of Belarus. It is also a major industrial center with large oil refineries nearby. The city has many green spaces and parks, as well as numerous museums and theatres.

Gomel, the second-largest city in Belarus is a good place to visit for its museums and architecture. Gomel is an important industrial center in Belarus producing machines and equipment for agriculture, construction materials, oil refining, and chemicals industries. It also has one of the largest automobile assembly plants in Eastern Europe.

Cost Of Living In Belarus

The cost of living in Belarus is relatively low compared to other European countries. A family with two children and two adults estimated monthly cost is BYN 4,911.81 ($1,453.83). While that of a single person is BYN 1,774.85 ($525.33)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around BYN 742 ($219.62)
  • Groceries and eating out per month for two people may cost BYN 791 (234.00)
  • The average salary in Belarus is BYN 2,990 ($885) per month

3. Bosnia and Herzegovina

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Bosnia and Herzegovina is about 50% lower than the European average. Food is relatively cheap but imported items from the west can be more expensive than local products.

In general, rent prices are affordable. Public transportation is usually cheap and reliable, consumer goods are more affordable than in most European countries with some exceptions. Education and healthcare are free in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina is a member of the European Union and it has no official language but Bosnian, Serbian and Croatian are widely spoken. The currency in Bosnia and Herzegovina is the Bosnian Convertible Mark (BAM) (KM) and an exchange rate of $1 – KM 1.92.

Best Places To Live & Work In Bosnia and Herzegovina

Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a country in southeast Europe. Life in Sarajevo is relatively affordable compared to other European capitals such as London or Paris. It’s now considered one of Europe’s most diverse cities.

The city is situated on the Miljacka River in the heart of Southeastern Europe and serves as the center of Bosnian culture, arts, and entertainment. Due to its long and rich history of religious and cultural diversity, Sarajevo has often been called the “Jerusalem of Europe” or “Jerusalem of the Balkans”.

The Bosnian city of Banja Luka is a great place to live for ex-pats, offering a low cost of living, high quality of life, and easy access to other parts of Europe. It is the administrative center of the Republika Srpska, an entity that constitutes one of the two entities of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Banja Luka National Theatre is one of the most important cultural institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina, while the city’s parks are also worth visiting if you want to relax or enjoy some fresh air. It has several museums, including the Museum of History, Museum of Contemporary Art, and Museum of Musical Instruments.

Cost Of Living In Bosnia And Herzegovina

The cost of living in Bosnia and Herzegovina is quite low compared to other European countries. However, there are some areas where prices are higher than the country’s national average. The estimated monthly cost of a person is about KM 2001 ($1,045.67) including rents. While that of a small family is estimated at KM 4715 ($2,463.93) including rents.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around KM 450 ($235.16)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost KM 475.00 ($248.21)
  • The average monthly salary is around KM 2,300 ($1,201.95)

4. Bulgaria

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The country is seen as an affordable place to live, with prices much lower than its Western European neighbors, and a pleasant climate year-round. Its capital city, Sofia, is the center of services for foreign companies doing business in the country; its location makes it central to travel throughout Bulgaria and to neighboring countries. There are many places to live within the city, which has made it a popular destination for ex-pats looking for apartments close to work or in quiet neighborhoods.

The cost of living in Bulgaria is notably lower than the average in the European Union. It is ranked as the 30th cheapest country in Europe and the 4th cheapest country in Eastern Europe. The prices of consumer goods, transportation, restaurants, and hotels are significantly lower than in other developed countries.

Bulgaria is not only seen as an attractive option for retirees looking for a cheap place to spend their golden years. Rather, ex-pats in Bulgaria are typically young and working for one of the multinational companies in Sofia, the capital city. Those who choose to live in Sofia do so because it offers affordable apartments compared to Western European capitals such as London or Paris. However, this affordability comes at a price: many of these apartments are far from desirable.

Bulgaria offers high-paying jobs to foreign workers who have gone through the long and expensive process required to obtain a work visa (sometimes lasting as long as a year). These jobs generally pay between BGN 1,341 – BGN 14,700 ($700 – $7676) per month so the cost of living in Bulgaria is low enough that ex-pats can save money while living there.

The Republic of Bulgaria is a member of the European Union and its official language is Bulgarian. The currency in Bulgaria is the Bulgarian lev (BGN) and an exchange rate of $1 – 1.92 BGN.

Best Places To Live & Work In Bulgaria

Sofia is a modern European city with all the necessary amenities for comfortable living: well-developed infrastructure, high-quality education, and healthcare systems, a wide network of public transport, numerous cultural and recreational facilities, etc.

 There are plenty of restaurants and shops, and lots of cultural activities as well. It’s also easy to get around because public transportation runs very frequently, including buses, trolleys, and trains.

Plovdiv is the second-largest city in Bulgaria and the administrative and economic center of Plovdiv Province. The city is an important economic, transport, cultural and educational center with significant strategic importance due to its location in southern Bulgaria.

The cost of living in Plovdiv is very affordable, especially when compared to other cities in Bulgaria or Europe for that matter. The city has a great nightlife scene and the restaurants are very affordable too. You can find pretty much anything from sushi to Mexican food, which is something that you would not find in many other Balkan cities!

Cost Of Living In Bulgaria

The cost of living in Bulgaria is relatively low. In the capital Sofia, it is possible to live on an income of BGN 1,532 ($800) per month if you’re a prudent spender. Groceries are inexpensive, as are utilities and rent. Transportation is also affordable, with local buses and trains offering affordable transportation for only a few dollars per trip. For an ex-pat couple with two children, the estimated monthly cost is around BGN 3,929 ($2,051.72), while that of a single person is BGN 1,640 ($856.41).

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around BGN 499.77 ($260.57)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost BGN 475.00 ($248.03)
  • The average monthly salary is around BGN 3,300 ($1,723)

5. Croatia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Croatia is a beautiful country, with a lot of stunning scenery and rich history. It is also a great place for holidays, with many people coming to visit from all over the world every year. However, it is also a good place to live as an ex-pat.

Croatia has an excellent reputation when it comes to tourism and hospitality. There are many opportunities for English speakers in this sector, as well as in other service industries such as construction and property management.

 The Croatian economy is doing well at the moment, so there are plenty of jobs for those who want them! If you don’t have any particular skills or qualifications then you can still find work in one of the larger towns or cities like Split or Zagreb where there is more demand for general laboring jobs.

Croatia has an excellent standard of living, with its GDP per capita being $31,047.33 per year. This is significantly lower than the European Union average of $32,755.38 per year and even higher than some countries such as Greece and even Russia (GDP per capita of $29,428 and $27,970 respectively).

The cost of living in Croatia is relatively low, but it does vary depending on where you choose to live. Salaries are also lower; food and entertainment are lower than in Western Europe. Food and clothing are relatively cheap compared to other European countries. However, if you want to find work in Croatia, then you will likely have to pay for your visa and travel costs.

Croatia has an excellent public transportation network with buses and trains connecting all major cities and towns. There are also many ferries for traveling between islands or along the coast.

In addition to this, Croatia’s unemployment rate is relatively low at 9% compared with the EU average of 9%. This means that there are plenty of jobs available in the country which makes it more attractive for those looking to relocate abroad.

The Republic of Croatia is a member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its official language is Croatian. The currency in Croatia is the Croatian Kuna (HRK) and an exchange rate of $1 – 7.37 HRK.

Best Places To Live & Work In Croatia

Zagreb has a vibrant cultural life and it hosts several museums, theatres and entertainment events. The city also has a wide offering of cinemas, clubs, shopping areas and also many parks that are worth seeing. The city also has many restaurants and cafes where you can eat.

Zagreb is home to many international companies that have set up offices here. The city has a strong technology sector too, with many start-ups launching new ideas into the market every year.

The city is small; people are friendly and the pace of life is relaxed. However, you will need to be able to speak Croatian and English to get by in the workplace.

The majority of jobs available in Split are in the hospitality industry – hotels and restaurants are always looking for good staff. Other jobs that require less language skills include tourism-related positions such as tour guides, travel agents, drivers etc.

Cost of Living In Croatia

The cost of living in Croatia is moderate, but it varies depending on where you choose to live. The capital city of Zagreb has a high cost of living, but it’s still cheaper than cities such as London or New York City. The cost of living in Croatia is about 44% lower than in the USA but higher than the average for Europe. The estimated monthly cost for a single person is HKK 7,697 (1,045.85), while an ex-pat couple with two kids is estimated at HRK 18,737 ($2,543.51) per month.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around HRK 3,338 ($453.13)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost HRK 3,445.20 ($467.67)
  • The average monthly salary in Croatia is around HRK 10,440 (€1,417.21).

6. The Czech Republic

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The Czech Republic is one of the most affordable countries in Europe. It’s also a great country to live in, with low crime rates, high standards of living, and a strong economy.

The cost of living in the Czech Republic is fairly low compared to other European countries, especially when it comes to renting. Utilities and transportation are additional expenses that you’ll need to consider when looking for accommodation in the Czech Republic. Utilities like electricity and heating are sometimes included in rent costs, but if not, expect to pay between €50 ($54) and €100 ($108) per month for these services (depending on your usage).

The cost of living in the Czech Republic is on a par with that of neighboring Austria, but lower than in Western Europe. The cost of living in Prague is moderate unlike those of other major European cities like Berlin and Vienna.

The Czech Republic is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Czech koruna (CZK) with an exchange rate of $1 – CZK 24.07. The official language is Czech, but English is widely spoken by both locals and ex-pats alike.

Best Places To Live & Work In the Czech Republic

Prague is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. It is the 14th largest city in the European Union. The city is known for its spectacular architecture, with many beautiful buildings from the 19th century. You can enjoy the countryside and cities, which are all worth visiting. Prague also offers opportunities for work, study, and travel.

Prague is home to many multinational companies and foreign subsidiaries. Most Czechs speak English and are highly skilled, making them attractive employees for foreign companies.

Brno is a beautiful city with many parks, gardens, and green spaces. It’s a modern city with a rich history, beautiful architecture and numerous green parks. It is also a very popular tourist destination with many historical sites and museums.

Working in Brno is a major decision for any ex-pat. As the second largest city in the Czech Republic, it offers many opportunities for ex-pats to make friends and get involved in the community.

Cost Of Living In The Czech Republic

The cost of living in Czech Republic is lower than in many other countries (42% cheaper than the US, 45% cheaper than the UK, 56% cheaper than Hong Kong). Prices for accommodation, food and drink are generally high, although there are some bargains to be had if you look around.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around CZK 16,320.11 ($677.97)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may CZK 7,221.17 ($300)
  • The average monthly salary in Czech Republic is around CZK 60,900 ($2,529.89)

7. Estonia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Estonia is one of the least expensive countries in Europe. The average cost of living in Estonia is less than half of those of Western European countries like Germany, Belgium, and  France.

Estonia is a relatively affordable place to live, with a cost of living index rating of 49.47. This means that the cost of living in Estonia is 32% cheaper than the United State

In addition, the cost of food, transport and entertainment is lower than in most Western countries

The cost of living in Estonia is very low. The country has one of the highest standards of living in Europe and its capital Tallinn is ranked as one of the world’s top ten digital cities.

Estonia has a very low unemployment rate of only 5.3%. This means that there are plenty of job opportunities and many vacancies available for foreigners.

As an expat, you will have to pay income tax on your earnings, but this is considerably lower than in most other European countries. You will also be required to pay social insurance contributions which are deducted from your salary and paid into a state pension fund for you.

The Republic of Estonia is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Estonian, but many people speak English as well.

Best Places To Live & Work In Estonia

Tallinn is a great city to live in. It’s easy to get around, has plenty of culture, and offers good employment opportunities. The city has a lot going for it: low crime rate, clean air, good transportation system, and a high quality of life. It is a very affordable city compared to other capitals in Europe. It’s not cheap by any means but it’s also not crazy expensive like London or Paris either.

The city has a strong IT sector and offers excellent opportunities for those who want to start a career in technology. The city offers a great quality of life and a wide range of opportunities for young professionals, families and retirees alike.

Tartu is a university town in southern Estonia, it is home to the country’s oldest and most prestigious university, the University of Tartu (UT), established in 1632 by King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden.

The city has a rich history and culture but also offers a modern lifestyle and excellent employment opportunities.

Cost Of Living In Estonia

Estonia’s cost of living is 10% lower than the EU average. The country has a very low unemployment rate, which is why many ex-pats choose to live here. The estimated monthly cost for an expat couple with two children is about €2,611 ($2,667.12), while that of a single person is around €900($919.34)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €400 ($408.97)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €213 ($217)

Average Salary: The average monthly salary in Estonia is around €1,310.00 ($1,338.17)

8. Georgia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Georgia is low compared with other countries around the world. This makes it an ideal place for people who want to retire or start their own business, as well as for those who are looking for opportunities in other countries.

The cost of living in the Republic of Georgia is very affordable. It is a great place to live and work. Georgia has one of the lowest costs of living in Europe, which means that it offers great opportunities for economic development.

Georgia has a decent infrastructure with good roads, though you should be prepared for some rough patches on your journey. In terms of public transportation, some buses and trains connect major cities and towns around the country. Several domestic airlines run cheap flights within Georgia as well as to neighboring countries such as Armenia and Azerbaijan. In terms of food, Georgian cuisine is quite diverse and delicious. Most restaurants offer traditional Georgian food at very affordable prices (around $3-$6). And if you prefer Western cuisine there are plenty of options available too!

Living in the Republic of Georgia can be a cheap experience, especially when compared to Western Europe’s and the USA’s standard of living. While certain aspects will cost you more once you decide to live in this beautiful country, others will cost you less.

The Republic of Georgia is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Georgia Lari (GEL) with an exchange rate of $1 – GEL 2.80. The official language is Georgian, but there is handful of English speakers as well.

Best Places To Live & Work In Georgia

Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, is a city that feels like it was designed for people who love life. While the city may not have the same history as some of its neighbors in Europe, it certainly has a charm all its own.

It is also one of the fastest growing cities in Europe with an average annual growth rate of 10% since 2000!

Batumi is a city in Georgia, located on the coast of the Black Sea in the country’s southwest. Batumi offers all kinds of entertainment, from casinos and nightclubs to museums and art galleries. Batumi is also home to one of Georgia’s most popular beaches, Batumi Sea Castle Beach.

Cost Of Living In Georgia

The cost of living in the Republic of Georgia is severely underestimated by many people. The reality is quite different than you might expect, especially if you’re coming from North America or Western Europe. The estimated monthly costs of an ex-pat couple with two children is GEL 7,012 ($2,500.36), while that of a single person is about GEL 3400 ($1,212.38)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around GEL 1,783 ($635.79)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost GEL 701.10 ($250)
  • The average monthly salary in Georgia is around GEL 4,380 ($ 1,561.59)

9. Greece

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Greece is higher than in most other European countries, but much lower than that of the U.S., Canada and Australia. The most expensive cities to live in Greece are Athens, Thessaloniki, Heraklion and Patras. Of these four Greek cities, Athens has the highest cost of living at $12,000 per year for a single person.

Greece has one of the moderate costs of living in the European Union (EU), with the price of consumer goods being almost timed higher than the EU average, and slightly lower for housing costs. Moreover, it is relatively cheaper to rent in Athens as opposed to London, or other capitals such as Moscow and New York City, highlighting a discrepancy between Athens and other cities across Europe. The purchasing power for salaries is also derived from high tax-free allowances in Greece, which does mean many people pay no income tax at all.

The overall cost of living for expatriates in Greece is about 76% lower than in the USA, and it’s even lower for single people who rent an apartment rather than families with children. Utilities, transportation, and clothing are some of the things that bring down the cost of living while food, which is primarily grown and produced locally (especially in Greek islands), groceries, education and health care are among the least expensive products or services in Greece.

Rent is often much cheaper than in northern Europe while offering high-quality services, telecommunications and living standards. Food and transport are also very cheap; these combined with low taxes, high salaries, and second incomes can improve your standard of living without having to spend a lot.

The Republic of Greece is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0. 97. The official language is Greek.

Best Places To Live & Work In Greece

Thessaloniki is the second largest city and is often seen as a student city, it is an amazing place for young people to start their journey. It’s bustling with life during the day but you’ll find some great nights out as well.

It is an economic hub, home to large universities and a Mediterranean port. Although sewn with topics like tourism, and economic and historical strength, it is also embedded with social challenges.

Patras is often called the city of yachts and motorcycles. It’s located in the western part of Greece; Patras is the economic and commercial hub of Achaea and the Peloponnese peninsula. Its port is Greece’s third largest and its coastline is dotted with seaside villas, restaurants, and luxury hotels that attract Greek families during the hot summer months, as well as foreign visitors unable to resist the charms of this stunning ode to ancient Greece.

Cost Of Living In Greece

The cost of living in Greece is low compared to other European countries. Yet the amount you spend depends on your habits and style. The estimated monthly cost of an ex-pat couple with two kids is around €2,708 ($2,773.92), while that of a single person is €1,132 ($1,159.31) with rents.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment for around €499($511.01)
  • Groceries and eating out per month for two people may cost €335 ($343.07)
  • The average monthly salary in Greece is around €2,430 ($2,488.03)

10. Hungary

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Hungary is an increasingly popular destination for expatriates and mobile workers, in part because of the favourable climate and beautiful scenery. High quality of life standards and affordable cost of living are among the reasons why expats love living in Hungary, and why it’s ranked 8th in the Ease of Settling Index by ECA International!

Hungary has an advanced economy that is mostly based on services but also has a significant industrial sector. The country produces chemical products and processed foods as well as machinery and electronic equipment for export markets. Agriculture accounts for only 1% of GDP but employs about 6% of the workforce.

The cost of living in Hungary is substantially below the European average. Housing costs, food and transportation prices are key factors for cost of living comparison. Other factors include utility bills, car prices, local purchasing power, taxes and other costs. Istanbul is certainly one of the cities that is cheapest to live in.

The cost of living in Hungary is significantly lower than Western Europe and Northern America. You will find Budapest to be a budget friendly city. For example, you can eat at an average restaurant for HUF 1800 ($4.63), while shopping spice blends or vegetables at the market will only cost you 400 HUF ($1.03). A monthly pass for the metro is 9,500 HUF ($24.43), and it is less expensive to live in Budapest than any other city in Hungary.

The cost of living in Hungary is lower than in the West. Budapest’s cost of living index is around 39.22 – 41.82 which is far lower than the US (new York’s cost of living index is 100) or Western Europe (the cost of living index of Zurich is 119.25).

The Republic of Hungary is a proud member of the European Union, and its currency is the Hungarian Forint (HUF) with an exchange rate of $1 – HUF 388.13. The official language is Hungarian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Hungary

Budapest is a beautiful city, rich in culture, history, and architecture. It also hosts many international companies and startups, including Google and Microsoft. Budapest is the capital of Hungary and the country’s largest city. The city has a unique nightlife, with many blues clubs and jazz clubs. Budapest also has a variety of architectural styles, from Art Nouveau to neoclassical buildings.

Debrecen is the second largest city in Hungary and one of the oldest in Europe.The city lies on both banks of the river Tisza. The most beautiful part is to be found on the western bank, with many parks and green areas. There are also a lot of museums and galleries.

Debrecen is also considered an important regional centre of international relations, to which end several cultural institutions are located here, including the House of Terror and the International Centre for Democratic Transition.

Cost Of Living in Hungary

Living cost in Hungary is very affordable, especially when compared to Western Europe. The cost of living in Hungary is about 20% less than in the UK or France. The Living cost of a small family (4 individuals) is HUF 886,837 ($2,280.79) with rents, while that of a single person is HUF 197,094 ($506.89) without rents.

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around HUF 152,037 ($391.01)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost HUF 97,208.14 ($250)
  • The average monthly salary in Hungary is around HUF 493,000 ($ 1,267.90)

11. Italy

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Italy is a topic that is often discussed by ex-pats, especially when they are considering moving to the country. It’s important to know how much you will spend on necessities such as groceries, transportation, and utilities before you move abroad. The cost of living in Italy varies depending on where in Italy you choose to live, but some affordable areas provide an excellent standard of living.

Italy’s cost of living has steadily increased over the past decade. However, despite the increase in prices, Italy remains one of the most attractive countries in Europe to live and work. The Italian economy is showing signs of recovery and growth after years of stagnation, which should continue to make Italy an attractive place for ex-pats to live and work.

Housing costs also vary depending on whether it is rented or owned by the resident. Renting an apartment can be cheaper than buying a house because mortgage interest rates are lower for renters since they do not pay for property taxes associated with owning real estate which increases the overall cost of home ownership.

In addition to the cost of accommodation, basic food items are also cheap. For example, a loaf of bread can cost up to €1.61, and a liter of milk costs around €1.60.

Italy has a relatively high cost of living compared with other European countries. However, this does not mean that visitors will find everything expensive. Many tourists consider Italy one of the best bargains for travelers in Europe because the food is so good and there are so many things to see at an affordable price.

One of the main reasons why Italy’s cost of living is higher than other European countries is because its food prices are higher than most other countries in Europe. That said, these prices are still very reasonable when compared with those found in North America or Australia. Italian restaurants tend to offer lower prices than those found at sit-down restaurants, while pizza parlors tend to be more expensive than both types of establishments.

The Republic of Italy is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Italian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Italy

Naples, which is located on the southwest coast of Italy, is a popular tourist destination that attracts thousands of visitors each year. With its beautiful beaches, ancient architecture, excellent food, and vibrant nightlife, Naples is certainly an interesting destination to live in.

It is an exciting city with a rich cultural heritage and vibrant nightlife. Home to many celebrities, fashion designers and sports stars, it has also been regarded as one of the world’s most beautiful cities.

A city of art and culture, Turin is a pleasant city to live in. With its rich history, it is a wonderful destination for tourists as well as expats who are looking for a new place to call home.

The city centre is a good place to live because there are lots of shops, restaurants, bars and clubs. It’s also easy to get around on foot or by public transport because it’s very compact.

Cost Of Living In Italy

A small family (4 individuals) estimated monthly costs is about €3,249 ($3,295.42), while that of a single person is around €1,300.85 ($1,319.28)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €700 ($709.91)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €400 ($405.60)
  • The average monthly salary in Latvia is around €1,850 ($868.11)

12. Latvia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The main reason why Latvia is so affordable is because of low costs of housing, food and transportation of all kinds. One interesting fact about Latvia is that despite being a European country, the population of Latvia speaks only 14% of their native language. That doesn’t mean you can’t learn Latvian before traveling.

The living cost in Latvia is lower than in most other European countries. The prices of food, accommodation, transportation and entertainment are more affordable. Food is cheaper in Latvia than in Western Europe.

 A kilogram of meat costs about €4-5; a bottle of local wine costs about €1; a liter of milk costs €1.06; a loaf of white bread costs about €1.00. The main meal at an inexpensive restaurant costs around €6.00 – €8.00 per person, while lunch at a fast food restaurant costs around €6 per person.

The cost of living in Latvia is very similar to the cost of living in its neighbor country, Estonia. The economy here is driven mostly by the banking, IT, and electronics sectors. There are many opportunities for expats who want to work in these industries. The fact that the Baltic countries have so many similarities with Western Europe makes it easy for expats to adjust to life here.

Riga is the capital and largest city of Latvia. It is situated on the Baltic Sea coast in its center. The city is home to more than one million people, with about two thirds of them being ethnic Latvians and minorities including Russians, Ukrainians, Belarusians, Poles and Lithuanians. The cost of living in Riga is one of its biggest selling points, but there are plenty of other reasons why Riga should be your next destination: You’ll need less than $1000 per month to live comfortably here without working full time if you choose to live frugally.

The Republic of Latvia is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Latvian.

Best Places To Live & Work Latvia

Riga is the capital city of Latvia, as well as its largest city. And also, one of the coolest cities in Europe. It has a rich history, beautiful architecture, and a vibrant atmosphere. The locals are friendly and welcoming, making it easy to adjust to life in Latvia.

The city has many beautiful old buildings, churches and monasteries. The city’s architecture is very diverse, from Baroque to Art Nouveau to Neo-Gothic style buildings.

Daugavpils is a city in south-eastern Latvia, located on the banks of the Daugava River, from which the city gets its name. It is the second largest city in the country after Riga and is situated approximately 170 km east of Riga.

Daugavpils is a railway junction and industrial centre with machinery and electronics industries. It also has agricultural machinery production and dairy plants. Daugavpils Airport is located 9 km south of the city.

Cost Of Living In Latvia

The cost of living in Latvia is relatively low compared with other European countries. A small family (4 individuals) estimated monthly costs is about €2,616, while that of a single person is around €659.85 ($673.91)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €341 ($348.34)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €135 ($137.89)
  • Average Salary: The average monthly salary in Latvia is around €850 ($868.11)

13. Lithuania

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Lithuania is low compared to the rest of Europe. The cost of food in Lithuania is much lower than it is in the UK or the US. Most basic items such as eggs, milk and fruit can all be found at affordable prices at supermarkets like Maxima, which has locations across Vilnius and Kaunas.

The main expense for expats moving to Lithuania will be accommodation, but this can be reduced by renting an apartment with friends or family until they find their own place. There are also plenty of cheap accommodation options available such as hostels and campsites if you want to save money while you’re finding your feet in a new country

The cost of living in Vilnius is about half that of London or Paris, and about one third that of New York City. While Lithuania’s average salary is quite low compared to other EU countries, things like food, transportation, and utilities are much cheaper here than in Western Europe or North America.

Eating out can be expensive if you eat at touristy restaurants or cafes near the Old Town Square in Vilnius. But there are many very good restaurants that serve traditional Lithuanian food at low prices.

The country also has some surprisingly good deals on alcohol and tobacco products (which are subject to high taxes in most countries). A bottle of local beer costs as little as €1.50, while a pack of cigarettes costs around €4.35.

The Republic of Lithuania is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Lithuanian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Lithuania

Vilnius is the capital of Lithuania and its largest city. It is a city of culture, history and beauty. It lies on the banks of the Neris River in southern Lithuania. The city is an important cultural center in Eastern Europe, with more than 500 museums, galleries and other cultural institutions. It has also been known as one of the greenest cities in Europe thanks to its extensive parks and green spaces.

Kaunas is the second largest city in Lithuania. It is a leading industrial center, where most of the country’s heavy industry and manufacturing is concentrated. Kaunas offers a wide range of services to its inhabitants, as well as visitors, who enjoy its museums, theaters, parks and other cultural institutions.

Cost of Living In Lithuania

Living costs in Lithuania are relatively low compared with other EU countries. The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,559 ($1,596.20), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €2,902 ($2,971.26).

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €400 ($409.58)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €350 ($358.35)
  • The average monthly salary in Greece is around € 1600 ($1,638.83)

14. Malta

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Malta is a small island nation with an extremely high quality of life. It’s easy to get around, the food is excellent and the weather is hot all year round. It’s also very affordable. You can live comfortably on less than €1,000 per month in Malta, including rent and other bills.

Malta offers a wide range of accommodation options to suit all budgets, from luxury hotels to budget hostels. There are many restaurants, bars and nightclubs in Malta where you can enjoy local cuisine or international cuisine at very affordable prices.

The cost of living in Malta is moderate, with a high standard of living and quality of life. Overall, the cost of living in Malta is lower than in most European countries. Malta’s economy is based on tourism and manufacturing, as well as financial services. The country has a very low level of unemployment and inflation.

The Republic of Malta is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official languages are Maltese and English. Italian is another language that is widely spoken.

Best Places To Live & Work In Malta

Valletta is the capital of Malta, a beautiful city with a rich history and a vibrant culture. It is a popular tourist destination and has been named as one of the top 10 cities in the world.

The experience of Mdina is one of a kind. It’s a town that has remained unchanged for centuries. The streets are narrow, the houses are tall and have been there for hundreds of years. The buildings are made of stone and brick, so they don’t really change with time.

The cost of living in Mdina is much lower than other parts of Europe, so it’s an excellent place for people who are on a budget. The average rent for an apartment in Mdina is around €250 per month, which is less than half the average cost of renting in other European capitals like London or Paris. Food is also cheaper here than in many other cities, so you can save money by cooking at home instead of eating out all the time.

Cost of Living In Malta

Living cost in Malta is something to be considered when choosing where to live. What your costs will be will depend on how much you spend and how much of your salary is available after taxes. The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,650 ($1,673.09), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €3,502 ($3,551.01).

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €740 ($756.44)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €350 ($358.35)
  • The average monthly salary in Malta is around €1,706 ($1,729.88)

15. Moldova

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Moldova is quite low. But the quality of life is much lower than what you get in Western Europe. The cost of living in Moldova is greatly affected by the fact that most products have to be imported from abroad because Moldova lacks the infrastructure for mass production. Other factors are the low wages for workers and the high flow of imports that depreciate local currency.

Moldova has a lower cost of living than the majority of its neighbors. The country is ranked as having one of the lowest costs of living in Europe. Moldova’s GDP per capita is $4,791 and its GDP per capita PPP is $14,250 (International Monetary Fund). The average cost of a meal for one person at an inexpensive restaurant is MDL 100.00 ($5.180). Utilities, transportation, and groceries will add approximately MDL 7,714.75 ($400) to your monthly expenses.

Moldovans love their wine and beer, so expect to pay more for alcohol than other goods. Most restaurants will serve you “raki” (local brandy) with your meal when you order a drink. Raki is the national drink of Moldova and comes in both red and white varieties.

Food prices are relatively low but can vary depending on where you buy them from. Grocery stores are open until 9pm every day except Sunday when they close at 6pm due to Orthodox Christian traditions which prevent people from buying food on Sundays.

The main industries in Moldova are agriculture, food processing, textiles and clothing, footwear, chemicals and mining products (manganese ore, limestone, dolomite), woodworking and furniture production.

The Republic of Moldova is not part of the European Union Member State, and its currency is the Moldovan leu (MDL) with an exchange rate of $1 – MDL 19.28. The official languages are Russian (also called Moldovan). Romanian is another language that is widely spoken.

Best Places To Live & Work In Moldova

Chisinau, the capital of Moldova, is an attractive city and has a rich cultural life. The city is also home to many beautiful parks and gardens. Chisinau has many museums, including the National Museum of Fine Arts and the Natural History Museum. There are also several theaters that put on plays in Romanian, Russian and English.

The main industries include textiles and food products, but there are also many electronics companies that have set up shops in Chisinau.

Tiraspol is a city in the Republic of Moldova and the capital of Transnistria, located on the eastern bank of the Dniester River.  The general public transport system consists of buses, trams, and trolleybuses. There are also taxi services available.

Tiraspol is considered one of Europe’s most beautiful cities due to its well-preserved parks and architecture dating back hundreds of years. Its boulevards are lined with Georgian mansions and charming churches; parks are abundant with flowers; fountains were built during the Soviet era

Cost of Living In Moldova

Living costs in Moldova are low by European standards, making it an affordable destination for budget travellers. The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about MDL 13,369 ($1,673.09), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at MDL 32,409 ($3,551.01)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around MDL 5,189.88 ($269.10)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost MDL 4,441.90 ($230.35)
  • The average monthly salary in Moldova is around MDL 26,600 ($1,379.23)

16. Montenegro

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

In the last couple of years, Montenegro has become one of the European destinations with the highest interest from tourists. Not only it is well known for the great beaches and a mild Mediterranean climate, but also for the affordable living. The cost of living in Montenegro is much lower than in Western Europe and many other destinations that attract tourists from all over the world.

The cost of living in Montenegro is relatively low, compared to Western Europe. The cost of accommodation in Podgorica, the country’s capital, are around the average European prices. The country is popular for its wide variety of affordable and quality food. Food isn’t usually much more expensive than in other European cities.

Food prices are reasonable and eating out isn’t too expensive like stated above. A meal at a restaurant will cost you between €5 and €10 depending on what you order. A pint of beer costs about €0.88 and a bottle of wine about €11 depending on the quality of the wine.

Education and health care are both free in Montenegro. The electricity bills fluctuate depending on the season, but they are estimated to be around €100 per month but increases if it’s a large family.

The Republic of Montenegro is currently in the process of joining the European Union but a member of the Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official languages are Montenegrins. Serbs is another popular language that is widely spoken in the country.

Best Places To Live & Work In Montenegro

Podgorica is the capital and largest city of Montenegro. The city is a beautiful place to live. It’s very safe and clean. There are many parks and green areas where you can go for walks or jog. There are also many restaurants, cafes and shops downtown where you can spend time with friends or family. Today it is an important industrial, cultural and educational center of Montenegro.

Podgorica has a number of attractions for tourists to enjoy including museums, galleries, historical landmarks and more. There are also many beautiful parks in Podgorica which make it a great place for outdoor activities such as hiking and cycling.

Niksic is a city and municipality in Montenegro. It is the second largest city of Montenegro, after the capital Podgorica, and it is composed of two municipalities: Niksic (the city itself) and Spuž (the surrounding villages).  Niksic is one of the oldest cities in Serbia and Montenegro, with a history dating back to Roman times. It has been an important religious center since the 15th century. In 1991 Niksic was declared a cultural heritage site by UNESCO.

Cost of Living In Montenegro

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €990 ($1,001.67), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €3,120 ($3,156.52)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €300 ($303.52)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €270 ($273.17)
  • The average monthly salary in Montenegro is around €1,070 ($1,082.52)

17. Poland

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Poland is one of the most affordable countries in Europe. Food and drink are particularly cheap, while accommodation costs are among the lowest in Western Europe.

The cost of living in Poland is relatively low compared to other EU countries, with prices for food and clothing in particular being significantly lower than those in western Europe. Transport costs are also comparatively low, although public transport can be expensive compared to private cars.

In general, the cost of living in Poland is about 34.1% lower than it is in the United States and even cheaper than in many parts of Asia. This means that you can live comfortably on less money here than you can in many other places around the world. It also means that if you are planning to relocate to Poland with children, you can expect your expenses to be significantly lower than if those same children were to attend school in the US or Europe.

Eating out and groceries are some of the biggest expenses for expats living in Poland. The cost of eating out at a mid-range restaurant will average about $40 per person for a meal with drinks. If you’re looking for something cheaper, you’ll find plenty of fast-food outlets and cafes offering “takeaway” meals at prices that are considerably lower than those charged in restaurants. Milk and other dairy products tend to be more expensive than other groceries. One litre of milk can cost anywhere between $0.5 – $1.2 depending on where you buy it from.

Poland is one of the most dynamic economies in Central Europe. It ranks high on many social indicators, including good health care and education. The country’s economy was one of the first to recover from the global recession as it has been growing at a rate between 4% and 5% per year despite currency fluctuations.

The Republic of Poland is a proud member of the European Union, and its currency is the Polish Zloty (PLN) with an exchange rate of $1 – PLN 4.70. The official language is Polish.

Best Places To Live & Work In Poland

Warsaw is a capital and largest city of Poland.  Warsaw has a lot to offer, with many museums and attractions including the Royal Castle, National Museum, Copernicus Science center and more.

Warsaw is a beautiful city with good architecture, nice people and lots of places to visit. There are many cafes around Warsaw where you can enjoy your coffee and work in peace. The weather is very nice all year round and it’s not too hot or cold.

Gdansk is a city in northern Poland. It’s a beautiful place, with a lot of history and culture. The city also has one of the biggest ports on the Baltic Sea so it can be pretty busy at times. It has many attractions which makes it a good place to visit. It has many historic buildings, monuments and museums which give you an insight into its past. It also has a great nightlife with plenty of bars and clubs to suit all tastes.

If you want to work in Gdansk, there are plenty of jobs available for English speakers. Most jobs require a very high level of Polish language skills though so make sure you get started early!

Cost of Living In Poland

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about PLN 4541 ($965.73), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at PLN 10,925 ($2.323.05)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around PLN 2,416.92 ($523.30)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost PLN 1,081.24 ($230.00)
  • The average monthly salary in Poland is around PLN 7,560 ($1,608.98)

18. Portugal

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Portugal is quite reasonable compared to other European countries. It is also affordable for a traveller on a budget. Lisbon is one of the best cheap capital cities in Western Europe and one of the 10 cheapest European cities overall.

The cost of accommodation depends upon its location and quality. You can get good accommodation at an affordable price. Food is very cheap in Portugal, especially the local cuisine. However, if you want to eat out at a restaurant, it will cost you more than eating at home. Transportation is quite cheap as well since most people rely on public transport instead of hiring cars or taxis for every trip they make. Healthcare services are also comparatively cheap as compared to other countries like USA and UK.

The cost of living in Portugal is relatively low compared to other European countries. The average price level is approximately 30% lower than in the U.K., and about 20% lower than in Italy or Spain. However, it should be noted that there are some areas of the country where prices are higher than average due to their popularity with tourists and expats.

The cost of living can vary widely depending on which areas you choose to live in. For example, if you settle in Lisbon you will pay more for accommodation than if you live outside the city center. If you choose Algarve as your destination, then rental prices will be higher than elsewhere in the country due to its popularity among tourists and expats.

In general, however, Portugal is still an affordable country for expats who want to relocate from other parts of Europe or from North America or Australia.

The Republic of Portugal is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Portuguese. Mirandese is another recognised regional language that is widely spoken.

Best Places To Live & Work In Portugal

Braga is the third largest city in Portugal, and it is located in the north-west region of the country, just south of Porto and north of Lisbon.

As a Portuguese city with both the country’s largest university and one of the most important hospitals, Braga is an excellent place to work. The city has a population of around 200,000 people and a relatively low unemployment rate (6.3%).

Nova de Gaia is a region in the north of Porto, Portugal. It is famous for its port wine, which can be sampled at one of the many local wineries. The area also offers great opportunities for walkers and cyclists.

The beach in Vila do Conde has long been a favourite among locals and tourists alike. It’s not just the beautiful golden sands that make it so popular, but also its proximity to Porto city centre and its wide selection of restaurants, bars and hotels at all budgets.

Cost of Living In Portugal

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,360 ($1,377.49), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €3,019 ($3,057.84)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €650 ($658.27)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €330 ($334.19)
  • The average monthly salary in Portugal is around €1,560 ($1,582.13)

19. Romania

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Romania is about 30% lower than in the European Union. The Romanian currency, the leu (RON), has been relatively stable since the country joined the EU, but it still fluctuates greatly against other currencies.

The cost of living in Romania is relatively low compared to other European countries, but this varies from region to region. It’s possible to live comfortably on as little as $750 per month in Bucharest, but if you want a more comfortable lifestyle then it will cost more like $1000 per month.

The cost of living in Romania is lower than in Western Europe or the United States.  Bucharest is cheaper than all Western European capital city and few southern American cities. Although the standard of living has steadily improved over the past decade, Romania remains and still is an affordable destination for expats looking to move abroad.

The Republic of Romania is a proud member of the European Union, and its currency is the Romanian leu (RON) with an exchange rate of $1 – RON 4.87. The official language is Romanian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Romania

Bucharest is the capital and largest city of Romania. It is located in the southeast of the country, at the western end of the Muntenia region. Bucharest is also a major economic center, being Romania’s main industrial and commercial center.

Bucharest is one of the most important business cities and cultural centers in Eastern Europe. It is also a significant transportation hub, being located near to all major Romanian cities, as well as having direct international connections to many European countries such as Germany, Italy, France and Spain.

Iasi is a city in Eastern Romania. The city is the second largest in the country and has a population of nearly 300,000 people. Iasi is the most important cultural center of the country; it has many museums, theaters and cinemas

Iasi is one of Romania’s major economic centers and home to many industries including food processing, textiles manufacturing and petroleum refining

Cost of Living In Romania

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about RON 3,711 ($762.46), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at RON 10,555 ($2,168.65)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around RON 1703 ($349.90)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost RON 900 ($184.93)
  • The average monthly salary in Romania is around RON 8,980 ($1,845.01)

20. Russia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Russia is very affordable, especially when compared to other countries in Europe. In fact, living costs in Russia are generally lower than they are in most Western European countries.

On the one hand, Moscow is among the most expensive cities in Europe, while on the other hand, the cost of living in other cities like St. Petersburg or Ufa is similar to that of neighboring Central European countries such as Poland or Ukraine.

Food is extremely affordable in Russia and you can expect to spend anywhere from $6 – $10 per meal depending on where you go and what type of food it is (fast food or sit-down restaurant). You can expect to pay about $7 for a cheeseburger at McDonalds or Burger King and about $9 – $20 for a decent lunch at a sit-down restaurant (like TGI Fridays).

Most grocery stores sell fruits and vegetables at very reasonable prices as well as meats like chicken breasts and pork chops which are usually sold by weight rather than by piece which makes them even more affordable. Certain items such as meatballs or sausage links can be quite expensive though so if you’re looking for something.

The food is cheap and plentiful, but sadly the water isn’t very good quality. Staying healthy on a limited budget is possible though, as long as you are aware that Russian food can be high in fat, sugar and salt.

Transport costs are fairly low thanks to low fuel taxes and cheap flights within Europe. However, road travel can be difficult during winter months owing to poor roads and traffic jams (due to poor road conditions).

The cost of living in Russia is very affordable. The Russian ruble is bouncing strongly against the dollar, however you can get a lot more for your money. It’s still not as cheap as India or China, but the cost of living in Russia is much lower than in Western Europe or North America.

The Russian Federation Republic is not part of the European Union Member State, and its currency is the Russian Rubles (RUB) with an exchange rate of $1 – RUB 19.28. The official languages are Russian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Russia

Saint Petersburg is the second largest city in Russia and one of the most popular tourist destinations. It has a rich history and culture as well as a stunningly beautiful architecture. It is also a great place to visit if you are looking for work or interested in getting involved with business opportunities.

The city is home to many different industries and businesses, from restaurants to factories, from engineering firms to technology companies, there are many different ways that you can get involved with the economy.

Novosibirsk is the third-largest city in Russia, after Moscow and St. Petersburg It’s one of the biggest cities in Siberia and the most famous for its science center. Novosibirsk has many historical buildings and natural sights, including Pobedy Square, where a huge statue of Lenin stands with his hand raised high to greet all who come to visit; the Museum of Fine Arts; and the Novokuznetsk Fortress.

The quality of life in Novosibirsk is quite good compared to other parts of Russia or even Europe. It’s not as cold as you might expect, and there are plenty of fun things to do outside during the summer months (but still plenty to do inside too!).

Cost of Living In Russia

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about RUB 93,288.65 ($1,552.54), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at RUB 193,436 ($3,200.11)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around RUB 1703 ($542.47)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost RUB 18,068.32 ($300.00)
  • The average monthly salary in Russia is around RUB 104,000 ($1,723.75)

21. Serbia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

The cost of living in Serbia is quite low compared with other European countries. However, it is important to mention that the cost of living varies between regions and cities. For example, Belgrade has a higher standard of living than some other Serbian cities.

The cost of living in Serbia is the 100th highest in the world, which means that it is slightly higher than average. The consumer price index has been rising steadily since 2000, and inflation has been above average for some time. Average salaries are also lower than average, so they don’t go as far.

A basic meal costs about $5.00 – $10.00, but you can get a full meal for less than $7.00. A three-course dinner for two people at a mid-range restaurant will cost about $30.00, and a cocktail will cost about $5.94.

A loaf of bread costs about $1.50 and a liter of milk is about $1.00. A gallon of gas costs about $1.46, and the average cost of electricity is $0.25 per kilowatt hour (kWh).

The average price of a movie ticket in Serbia is around $6.00 and the average price for one liter of bottled water is around $0.36.

In general, the cost of living in Serbia is much lower than in Western Europe or the U.S., but it also depends on your lifestyle and spending habits. If you are willing to live on a modest budget, you can easily survive in Serbia for less than $1,000 per month (for one person). However, if you want to live like a king (or queen), you will need at least $2,000 per month (for two people).

The Republic of Serbia is an aspiring member of the European Union (it’s not yet part of the EU Member State, but plans to join by 2025), and its currency is the Serbian dinar (RSD) with an exchange rate of $1 – RSD 115.78. The official language is Serbian.

Best Places To Live & Work In Serbia

Belgrade is the capital and largest city of Serbia. The city is beautiful, there are many parks and green spaces, it’s full of life and energy. The people are friendly and polite. I’ve met many people who speak English, which makes things easier for me as an expat.

Often called the “heart of Serbia”, it is classified as a Beta- global city by GaWC, and is considered to be one of the three major centers for architecture, culture and art in Eastern Europe alongside Prague and Moscow

The public transportation is great: buses, trams and trains run frequently and there are multiple lines on each route so you can easily get to any part of town quickly

Novi Sad is the second largest city in Serbia, and is well-known for its culture and history. The city is one of the most developed cities in Serbia. It has many IT companies and engineering centers, which makes it a great place to work as an expat.

The main industries are food processing and manufacturing, as well as chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

The city offers affordable housing, excellent security and quality of life. The city is also well known for its music festivals and cultural events, so you will find plenty of things to do in your free time.

Cost of Living In Serbia

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about RSD 79,753.00 ($689.59), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at RSD 278,279 ($2,405.49)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around RSD 21,879.10 ($180.25)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost RSD 18,787.00 ($162.49)
  • The average monthly salary in Serbia is around RSD 82,515 ($712.98)

22. Slovakia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

If you are looking for a new home, Slovakia could be the ideal choice. With a population of 5.5 million people, this country has plenty to offer its residents and is becoming increasingly popular with expats. It is often overlooked when compared to neighbouring countries such as Hungary or Poland, but Slovakia has much to offer those looking for a new home.

The capital city of Bratislava is a great place to live and offers many attractions including old castles, markets and museums. It is also one of the greenest cities in Europe with several parks and forests surrounding it.

The cost of groceries in Slovakia is very reasonable compared to other countries. You can get some great food at reasonable prices if you know where to shop and what to look for. Milk costs about $0.69 per liter (about 0.88 cents per quart) while eggs are $1.90 per dozen.

Public transportation in Slovakia is not cheap but it’s also not too expensive either. A monthly pass on public transportation will usually run around $30 or so depending on which city you live in and how often you ride the bus or subway system there. You can also buy tickets each time you ride which will save money over time but will cost more each trip since they’re sold individually instead of as a monthly pass that covers many trips throughout the month or year.

The cost of living in Slovakia is among the lowest in Europe, with prices for things like food and utilities being lower than those in neighboring countries such as Austria and Hungary. Accommodation costs are generally low, too. In fact, you can find decent hostels that cost less than €30 per night in most major cities in Slovakia.

The Slovak Republic is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Slovak.

Best Places To Live & Work In Slovakia

Bratislava is the capital city of Slovakia and one of the most beautiful cities in Central Europe. It is located at the confluence of two rivers, the Danube and the Morava, which meet at an angle of 1800 degrees. The country’s economy relies mainly on industry (especially car manufacturing) and agriculture (especially viticulture).

In addition to being home to many international companies such as Microsoft, IBM or Dell, Bratislava also offers great opportunities for expats looking for jobs in IT, finance or sales.

Kosice is the second largest city in Slovakia. The city is located in the eastern part of the country, on both sides of the upper Vah River. Kosice is often called “Little Vienna,” because it was once the capital of Slovakia and has many similarities to the Austrian capital.

Kosice offers many opportunities for expats looking for jobs in Slovakia. Many multinational companies have offices in Kosice and there are also several large companies that have been founded by Slovaks based in Kosice.

Cost of Living In Slovakia

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,309 ($1,330), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €2,704 ($2,746)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €591 ($600)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €208 ($211)
  • The average monthly salary in Slovakia is around €1,500 ($1,512.98)

23. Slovenia

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Slovenia is a small country, but it has a lot to offer. In the north, you can go skiing and hiking; in the south, there are vineyards and beaches. Slovenia is known for its natural beauty and outdoor activities, so if you like hiking or biking, this might be a good place for you to live. It’s also easy to get around in Slovenia because most people speak English. The cost of living is low compared to other countries in Europe, so many people choose to live here as expats.

Slovenia is an ideal place to live for expats who want to be close to Europe but far enough away from the big cities. It’s surrounded by mountains, so you can enjoy hiking and skiing during the winter months. The country also boasts some of the best beaches in Europe, so you can enjoy some sunbathing during the summer months too!

Like previously stated, Slovenia is one of the cheapest countries in Europe, and it’s relatively cheaper than most of its neighbors. Food, transportation and accommodation are relatively affordable compared to other parts of Western Europe. The main reason why Slovenia is so cheap is because it’s so small and undeveloped — you won’t find many high-end restaurants or luxury hotels here.

Slovenia is one of the cheapest countries in Europe. Beer, for example, costs around €1.25 ($1.26) per pint in bars and restaurants, while a three-course meal for two in a good restaurant can cost as little as €30 ($31.54). A pensioner could live comfortably on less than €900 a month, while Slovenia has no sales tax or income tax.

That said, there are some things that can be expensive in Slovenia. Alcoholic beverages are more expensive than in other EU countries, as are cigarettes (although the prices have dropped recently). Also, medical care is more expensive for foreigners than for Slovenes; however, if you have an EHIC card (European Health Insurance Card), then this won’t be a problem — see our section on healthcare below for more details!

The Republic of Slovenia is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Slovene. Italian and Hungarian are other recognised regional languages spoken in the country.

Best Places To Live & Work In Slovenia

Ljubljana is the capital of Slovenia and is the largest city of the country. Ljubljana is also the largest Slovenian industrial, cultural and political center. There are many universities in Ljubljan that are considered to be world class. The city has a number of museums that can be visited by tourists as well as students. It also has many beautiful parks which are ideal for spending some time with friends or family members after class hours or during vacations.

The city of Maribor is the second largest in Slovenia, with approximately 120,000 inhabitants. The city is a center for culture, education and industry. The University of Maribor is one of the largest universities in Slovenia.

There are many companies that have offices in Maribor, including Microsoft, Siemens and Ericsson. This makes it an attractive place for expats looking for work in the area.

Cost of Living In Slovenia

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,209 ($1,233.25), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €3,099 ($3,161.17).

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €465 ($474.34)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €362 ($369.27)
  • The average monthly salary in Slovakia is around €1,970 ($2,009.36)

24. Spain

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

Spain is a diverse country with a lot to offer, including beautiful beaches and mountains, rich history and culture, fascinating cities and much more. It is also one of the most popular destinations for expats.

The country is known for its great food, wine and art. It is also known for its beautiful beaches, mountains, and scenery. The weather in Spain is very mild compared to other countries in Europe, making it an ideal place for people who want to live there.

Spain is a very cheap country to visit. The cost of living is a little over half of the UK or US, and the average salary for Spaniards is lower than most other European countries.

The cost of food and drink is particularly low in Spain. For example, a meal at an inexpensive restaurant costs around $15 per person, while a glass of wine will only set you back $10 – $20. A supermarket shopping trip for one week can easily be done on less than $70 per person if you make careful choices about what you buy.

You can live comfortably in Spain for less than $1000 per month if you choose simple accommodation and eat out rarely. If you want to stay longer term and rent an apartment or house from private owners rather than staying in hostels or hotels, then it’s possible to live on less than $800 per month if you’re willing to live frugally.

That said, Spain does have some areas where prices are higher than average — mostly around larger cities like Madrid and Barcelona. But even there, you can find good deals on food and lodging if you’re willing to shop around a little bit.

 Although Spain’s economy has been hit hard by the global financial crisis, it’s recovering well. The unemployment rate has fallen from 25% to around 18%, and there are plenty of jobs available for those who speak Spanish and have relevant experience.

The Kingdom of Spain is a proud member of the European Union and Eurozone, and its currency is the Euros (EUR) (€) with an exchange rate of $1 – €0.97. The official language is Spanish.

Best Places To Live & Work In Spain

Seville is a city in southern Spain. It is the capital of the autonomous community of Andalusia and the province of Seville. The city of Seville is renowned for its fine cuisine and rich cultural heritage. It’s also a great place to work. The city has a thriving economy with many multinational companies such as Telefonica and Bacardi having offices here. There are also a number of start-ups and small businesses.

Valencia is Spain’s third largest city, with a population of almost 800,000. It is also the capital of the Valencian community and the largest port on the Mediterranean Sea. There are many reasons why you may want to work in Valencia.

The city has developed into the most important cultural centre in the region and offers a wide range of cultural activities such as museums, art galleries, theatres and libraries. The city has many green areas where you can enjoy outdoor activities such as riding a bike or walking along its promenades.

Cost of Living In Spain

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about €1,317 ($1,343.14), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at €3,110 ($3,171.91)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around €650 ($662.77)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost €476 ($485.45)
  • The average monthly salary in Spain is around €2,710 ($2,763.95)

25. Turkey

Cheapest Countries In Europe To Live & Work Compared

There are many reasons to live in Turkey. The country is located at the crossroads between east and west, so it has a rich cultural heritage that includes Greek, Roman and Ottoman influences. It’s also a modern nation with a vibrant economy.

Likewise, there are many things to do in Turkey. You can visit historical sites such as Ephesus, which was once one of the largest cities in the world; see ancient ruins; hike through lush forests; go skiing; swim in the Aegean Sea; watch the sun set over Istanbul’s Bosphorus Strait; or take a day trip to nearby Greece or Cyprus.

Turkey is a cheap country for travellers. The most expensive places to live in Turkey are Istanbul and Ankara, but even these cities don’t have astronomical prices like some places in Europe or North America.

The cheapest hotels and hostels in Turkey are generally found on the coast, such as in Bodrum or Marmaris. In Istanbul and Ankara, you’ll pay more for accommodation but this is still much cheaper than Europe or America.

You can get a good meal in a decent restaurant for around $2 – $10. And it’s also possible to find budget accommodation for less than $20 per night, although there are exceptions.

The Republic of Turkiye is a not yet part of the European Union Membership States, and its currency is the Turkish lira (TRY) with an exchange rate of $1 – TRY 17.90. The official language is Turkish.

Best Places To Live & Work In Turkey

Bursa is a city on the Marmara Sea coast of north-western Turkey, which serves as the administrative center of Bursa Province. Bursa is an important industrial and commercial center in Turkey.

Its major agricultural products include cotton, rice and tobacco (the latter two were introduced by the Ottomans). Bursa’s textile industry has long been known for its production of high-quality carpets made from silk and wool (wool being another product introduced by the Ottomans).

Adana is a city in southern Turkey, part of Adana Province, it is the 5th largest city in Turkey and one of the fastest growing cities in the country. The city is also the centre of the Adana-Mersin Metropolitan Area, with a population of 2 million people.

Adana is best known for its agricultural products, especially cotton and oranges. The region also produces textiles, machinery, leather goods and chemicals.

Cost of Living In Turkey

The estimated monthly expenses of a single person are about TRY 7,830 ($437.43), while that of a small family (4 individuals) is estimated at TRY 24,291 ($1,360.15)

  • You can get a decent furnished studio apartment around TRY 2,829 ($158.46)
  • Groceries and eating-out per month for two people may cost TRY 2,363.21 ($132.27)
  • The average monthly salary in Turkey is around TRY 10,024 ($561)

Tips For Immigrants Moving To Europe

Moving abroad can be a daunting task. If you’re moving to Europe, here are some tips to help you get settled in your new home. This guide will help you get organized and answer some of your questions about moving to Europe.

  • Check out the climate in the country you want to move to. It’s important that you do this before you make any plans because it will affect your choice of location and how you live there.
  • Learn some key phrases in the local language before you arrive. The more effort you put into learning basic words and phrases, the easier your life will be when you arrive in your new home. You’ll always make an impression by greeting locals in their native tongue — even if it’s just “hello” or “please.”
  • There are many countries in the world that features both expensive and inexpensive cities, so you may have to find a balance. price of goods/food are higher in tourist and city areas, while cheap places may be a distant place too off the path. Nevertheless, where you decide to live are to be influenced by your priorities.
  • If you’re considering moving overseas, it’s important to do have background knowledge about the country you want plan to move to. This includes knowledges on housing, jobs, public transport, environment, taxing, utility bills, and local culture. For those planning on relocating abroad for work purposes, it’s also important that you do your research on the country’s economy and job market. For example, if the country is experiencing an economic downturn or has a high unemployment rate, this may affect your ability to find work there.
  • It’s important to have an open mind about where you want to live. Have an open mind about where you want to live; it’s better to be pleasantly surprised than disappointed. If you have a few cities in mind, make sure they all have strong job opportunities, affordable housing and good schools for your children.
  • Planning and cutting down your monthly expenses when moving abroad can help reduce the financial burden of moving. You don’t have to cut everything out of your budget — just cut down on some of the unnecessary expenses that you don’t absolutely need. Here are some tips for how to plan and cut down your monthly expenses when moving abroad.
  • Reduce your monthly cost entertainment. The best way to cut back on entertainment expenses is to spend time with friends at home or go for walks or picnics instead of going out for dinner or drinks every evening. It may be difficult to cut back on entertainment expenses if you have a family, but there are still ways that you can reduce your spending. For example, instead of going out to a movie, rent one and make popcorn at home.
  • Buying basic food items at local markets rather than buying them from supermarkets and shops is another great way to save money. Local markets usually consumer goods like fruit, vegetables, beverages, and dairy products at lower prices than supermarkets because they hardly use expensive adverts or pay high rent to pay so they can afford to sell their products more cheaply. You can make your own meals instead of buying pre-made ones in the supermarket. This way you know exactly what is going into your food, which will help you eat healthier and cut down on costs. If you buy these items from the market then you will also be supporting local businesses which means that they will stay open longer and provide more jobs in your area.
  • Do background research on accommodation expenses when moving abroad. If you want to stay in an apartment, find out what the average rent is in the area you’re moving to. Another important factor is how much space there is in each property. Some places will have small rooms but plenty of them, while others will have larger rooms with fewer options overall. If possible, try and find a place with enough space for all your belongings as well as some extra room for guests if needed.
  • Many countries in the EU employs similar entry requirements, however there have little differences. Common factors that determines your entry requirements include the country of birth (nationality), recent places you’ve traveled, time duration you intend to stay, and your plans to do while there.
  • Make sure you hold a valid passport and any of the paperwork or documents needed to get in. You will need your passport to travel into most European countries. If you’re coming from America, make sure it’s up-to-date and hasn’t expired. Also, check if you need any additional paperwork before leaving on your trip. The process can be complicated, and it’s important not to leave it until the last minute.
  • Research how to move! We’ve compiled some useful moving and packing tips to help you, as well as expat guides. Make sure your documents are in order by contacting both local authorities and embassies in your new home country. You may need a visa or other documents depending on where you’re moving from and where you’re going. It’s important that you understand the requirements of both countries before leaving so that you don’t encounter problems when applying for visas or residency permits later down the line. Ensure that any equipment or appliances that require certification or registration will be able to be used safely in your new location. For example, electrical appliances may require certification before use (check with local authorities).
  • Meet with a relocation consultant who can advise you on everything from finding accommodation to setting up utilities and even finding places of interest around town (e.g., museums). Consultants can also give advice on how much it will cost for shipping items such as furniture and cars overseas, which is helpful when trying to save money during the move process (and afterwards too!).
  • If you want to compare the cost of living in different cities, head over to Numbeo or Expatisan. They provide many free information about consumer prices, allows easy estimation on your one expenses, uses information from natives citizen to get the most reliable data, and more.

Questions You Should Answer Before Moving To Europe

Moving to a new country, especially a distant one is not an easy decision, and you need to be sure that it’s the right one for you. There are many things you need to consider, especially if you are planning to work abroad. You need to find out what kind of work permits are available, where can you find job opportunities and how much will it cost.

  • What is my budget?
  • Do I want to move permanently or temporarily?
  • How long do I plan on staying in Europe?
  • What kind of job do I want?
  • What kind of environment do I want?
  • Will this job allow you to travel around Europe?
  • Can I afford it?
  • Am I prepared for the challenges of living abroad?
  • What about healthcare and insurance?
  • How will I fund my life overseas?
  • Does this move make sense personally?
  • Does this move make sense financially?

If you’re considering moving to another European country, hopefully, these salary figures help you determine where you can live comfortably with your current salary. Admittedly, this data can provide an incomplete picture of the overall cost of living in different countries, so I’d encourage everyone to do their research (especially if you’re looking outside the top five on my list).

These are the cheapest countries to live and work in Europe right now, hope you have smooth and safe immigration.

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